Tag Archives: sunflowers

Coming Home

All the lessons of my life
Come out in song and sung and rhyme,
The trick is hearing what you sing
And dancing to it all in time.

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A note of hope all through the art,
A time to tell and time to start,
Feelings felt through voice and strings –
Each time, a lullaby for the heart.

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These stanzas may or may not make it into a future song, but they’re true.

I wrote the first one a few weeks ago in a five-minute bit of inspiration, and the second one came a few days later on my bike ride home from work. Exercising and not driving is good for that, songwriting and soul-rising and half-rhyming ¬†ūüôā

I actually gave a small preview of the song below in a post a few months ago, Orlando in words and pictures – Part I. I was singing it then, I was singing it a year ago when I wrote it, and I’m singing it today.

The difference today is that today I’m sharing it with you. I’ve written several¬†songs in the past close-to-two years since I started playing the guitar, and I’ve only played a few of them, in a few instances, for other people. They’ve mostly been mine and for me, and they’ve served a purpose, but I’ve been feeling a little more ready to be a little less selfish ūüôā

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The flowers are blooming all the hours, the rivers are running on, and it’s time to share a song. The lyrics are below, and the voice and the guitar, me singing and playing, are in the link. Enjoy! ūüôā

Coming Home (mp3)

On the road and I’m a
Coming home and I’m a
Thinking how I’m gonna
Rock and roll again and
When the stars turn in and
Wake the sun again I’m
Gonna see the light in your eyes

Once upon a time I
Had a dream and I was
Flying high up in the
Amber sky and I was
Trying to find a piece of
Pie and ice cream and I
Found it when I woke in your arms

Clouds are passing by and
Here the sun is shining
On the path that leads to your heart,

Rivers running on and
I’m a swimming, coming
To the grand parade for my part

Steps and notes and fanfare
On the road and my hair
Mussed and tussled wildly
Worldly I must go there
Cares are there behind me
Like a run that’s finally
One touch closer to my old home

Memories come and go and
Stir the love that’s flowing
Like a spring that rises and falls

Water ever pure and
Nourishing the thirst for
More of what’s to come and recall

Images of learning
How to ride and turning
This and that way wildly
On my hands and scraped knees
Tears are falling and I’m
Up again and rolling
On my way to where the heart is

***************************

Rolling on and I’m a
Walking on and I’m a
Talking to the sun a-
bove and down below the
View I’m coming to and
Once again I’m choosing
Going to the hills with my dear

Daylight coming and I’m
Waking up and moving
With July and August
Days that heat us up and
Meet us where we’re at and
Bring the joy and laughter
Of the road right into our hearts

Hundred miles and counting
Down to the old fountain
Where we shared a drink and long kiss

First of many more and
Then I went out touring
Looking for what I thought I’d missed

Wishing wells and daisies
Pushing through the hazy
Skies to find the light and
Shine it on the fields and
Feeling like it’s time to
Greet the rushing tide and
When it comes I know I’ll be there

Everywhere the day is
Singing our good graces,
Feel the breeze upon your soft cheek

And there comes the sunrise,
Morning dew and our eyes,
Misty with all that we do seek

Open to the wind and
Going through with vintage
Shades that let the light come
In like joy from children
Laughing and all playing
And I know I’m making
My way back to where the love is

**************************

On the road and I’m a
Coming home and I’m a
Thinking how I’m gonna
Rock and roll again and
When the stars turn in and
Wake the sun again I’m
Gonna see the light in your eyes

Wandering far and wide and
Pondering on the time and
Watching mountains rising
And the eagles flying
All a part of life and
Loving the reminder
To look round and call you my dear

Clouds are passing by and
Birds are fast supplying
Melodies that sing of one love

Rivers running on and
Shaping stunning canyons
To behold from my view above

Lovely trees are swaying
In the breeze and saying
Come with me, we’re playing,
And the leaves displaying
Green right now and later
Red and orange and oh how
Like the sun they love the big stage

Colors come and go and
All along they’re showing
Spring and fall and all the new days

And I see the flowers
Blooming all the hours
Pedals ready and now awake

Steady was the dream and
Towards the love and gleaming
Did I go believing
In the wonders weaving
And now I can see the
Sun and clouds and streams and
With the light I’m shining my way

Shine the light and shine it
Nice and bright,
I’m coming

Shine the light and shine it
Nice and bright,
I’m feeling

Shine the light and shine it
Day and night,
I’m coming

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Friday Flowers and Pedal Progress

Two weeks ago, the sunflowers in my garden, that the garden planted for me, were just beginning to bloom. Friday, June 26 saw a couple of these:

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and a few of these

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Also present were some of the following:

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Readers of past posts and those who grow gardens will probably recognize these vegetable varieties. For others, who might need a helpful hint or who like a little challenge, here are clues as to what the three plants above are: the names of the plants, provided in the same order as the pictures above, in newspaper comics-page jumble form.

    • AHIRDS
    • MOTTOA
  • MURMES SSUAHQ

(*Unjumbled answers below)

Two days ago, on Friday, July 10, my morning trip to the garden included a show of similar, and greater, color.

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Yellow, red, orange, reddish-orange, and more, the full blooms have begun, and the bees are buzzing, about they go.

In the garden, I took a tour, and like walking through an outside room full of sun, the leaves and I are loving, all that grows.

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Along with the sunflowers, the three plants above (*radishes, tomatoes, and summer squash) continued on as well. Not pictured are some of the fruits and vegetables already harvested from these plants. The garden also planted some more of the following for me this year (July 10 portraits as well):

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Morning glories

and I transplanted in some of these

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Cucumbers

The flowers are from my garden back home, but the words come from the road. The petal progess is something to behold, and I’m happy to share it with everyone who loves flowers, color, and life.

Meanwhile, I’m also pursuing some pedal progress, about which I’ll share a bit too.

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Today I went for a 74 mile bike ride, from Oswego to Geneva, NY. Tomorrow will be another 60 miles, and then it’ll be about the same in the 70 to 80 mile range each day after that, until on the seventh day I arrive back at our final destination in New Jersey.

Along with 175 other riders and a crew in support, I’m participating in the annual Anchor House Ride for Runaways, which helps raise money for the Anchor House, a nonprofit in Trenton, NJ that supports runaway, abused, and at-risk children.

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The Anchor House provides temporary housing, counseling, and other important services for kids in need.

If you’re in a giving mood and would like to join in the support, here’s a link you can visit. Your generosity, whether expressed at home in your corner of the world, or expressed and felt also in Trenton, is always appreciated. If you like, you can also follow the events of the Anchor House Ride through the articles posted this week at¬†Planet Princeton.

Hope you and everyone are having a great and bright week ūüôā

-Dave

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On time, and in time, in the garden

The community gardening season is back!¬†Actually it’s been back for a month now, with the recreation department having prepared the plots and let us know we could get started¬†on May 1st. I’ll admit that my¬†initial reaction to the later start was to be annoyed (late March/early April would have been better for peas and other things), but when I did finally make it¬†there on May 9th (yep, more than a week after I could), it turned out alright. Like it always does ūüôā

Had I gone right away, I wouldn’t have seen the small plants coming up from the seeds left behind by last year’s plants – sunflowers, morning glories, and radishes! Apparently there were some strong little seeds¬†that made it through the winter and¬†the recreation department’s roto-tilling.

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Upon initial inspection, seeing a lot of brown

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But then after looking more closely, some green

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And some more

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And more! Here, a radish seedling.

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A cilantro plant said hello as well

It was a reminder that timing is everything. And that also important is how you respond. This time (and lately more times than not, I believe) my response was (and has been)¬†one of more going with it and seeing the beauty and appreciating what’s there. I wouldn’t call it a laissez-faire attitude, which would imply a lack of action and responsibility, but rather more of a forward-moving, active one, with ownership acknowledged. I can control and act on what I can, like getting started in the garden and planting things (tomatoes, basil, hot peppers, summer squash, cucumbers, corn, edamame, and more sunflowers, cilantro, and radishes!, so far), but you never know how it’s going to turn out. So you go with it and adapt along the way. Like, for instance, how it looks¬†like I’m going to be planting some more seeds or buying more transplants (I actually just got some cucumber and tomato transplants at the farmers’ market yesterday) for the places where the cucumber, edamame, and cilantro seeds didn’t¬†come up. And¬†that’s okay. And like, for instance, how I can take more classes, write more, draw more, apply for different jobs, go on dates, meet more people, and¬†do whatever, and we’ll¬†see how it goes¬†and figure it out.

When you have the right mindset, things also seem to happen at the right time. A friend of mine, who read a number of foodnsight posts recently, remarked how a lot of them were about time, and¬†I think he’s right. I’d thought about starting the blog¬†for a while, but it didn’t actually happen…until it happened to be right¬†time.

A coconut falls when it’s ready.

You can’t say your mother’s soup is the best until you’ve stepped out of her kitchen.

Proverbs add spice to language.

I think, but I’m¬†not completely sure, that’s how¬†these¬†three food / life / thought proverbs go. That’s how¬†I remember them at least, having heard them in lecture and in conversation by a bouncing, full of life college professor who¬†was originally from Ghana and who you could tell truly¬†enjoyed what he was doing both¬†in school as a professor and outside of school as a minister, which in general was teaching, connecting¬†with people, and adding a lot of energy and spice all around.

It’s always the right time to do what you want to do, and to do what feels right. The¬†coconut for the inception of this¬†blog fell¬†a little over a year ago, and more have been falling since, at different rates. Sometimes it’s a chance encounter with a special rutabaga (and a day off from work, and¬†the deadline of a family gathering), or sometimes it’s a neighbor’s gift of plantains (and a good run, plus a friend’s general suggestion to let the words come more easily), and then it falls more¬†quickly. Other times it’s the lessening¬†shelf-life of a winter squash, or that the gravity (and levity) simply builds up, and then it’s time. In any case, the cumulative result is also a chronicle of time passing, a certain curated version of my life that also, I hope, comes with bits of art, truth, and beauty mixed in with the radishes, pumpkins, and risotto. It’s also great when the¬†fun, funny, and creativity are all flowing.

Given the timing of this post, more than a month after the last one, I say we also take a little time and a quick look at some of the food highlights and time-points from May.

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Plantains – I made them, and they were awesome! I more or less followed my neighbor’s recipe, which in my case turned out to be¬†the following: after letting three yellow plantains ripen (after about a week they softened a bit and the outsides turned somewhat black), I peeled them, sliced them into coins, and fried them for 5-10 minutes (flipping them halfway through) in an oil mixture of 2 cups canola oil and 2 Tbsp palm oil. I also let the oil heat up first before frying them (medium heat), and when they were done I placed¬†them on a plate with a paper towel to dry.

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Spinach¬†– This one also deserves an exclamation point. Sauteed spinach with chopped garlic and rutabaga, made¬†in a mixture of canola and palm oil! I could have eaten a plateful of this it was so good.¬†It was easy too: I sauteed the diced rutabaga (about a cup’s worth) in a few Tbsp of¬†oil over medium heat, then added the¬†diced¬†garlic (a few cloves worth) and sauteed that¬†also until it was softened just like the rutabaga (this brought me to about 15 minutes now from the start), and then added the spinach (about 8 oz, but you can add more) and let it cook over low heat for a few minutes until the spinach was wilted (pictured above). As if that¬†wasn’t good enough (though it was, believe me), I also tried the following: 1) adding a handful of chopped raisins and chopped sliced almonds, and 2) adding the¬†chopped raisins and almonds, and also adding some finely shredded Parmesan cheese. Both¬†ways, so good.

If the canola and palm oil mixture sounds familiar too, it¬†should! It’s¬†the same oil that I used for the plantains. And by the “same”¬†oil, I do literally mean the same oil because, really, although plantains soak up some oil when they’re fried, the amount that remains from the original 2+ cups of oil when frying¬†three plantains is…well, I didn’t measure it, but it looked something like 1-2 cups still remaining. So there was plenty left for me to¬†use with¬†everything I cooked for about two weeks afterwards ūüôā And the rutabaga! Like a squirrel saving a food-prize for later, I still had a softball-size piece of rutabaga left over from the original¬†big one, tucked away in the back of the fridge, waiting for me to use. I had just gotten a fresh bag of spinach from the farmers’ market, and something in my head put the two together…spinach and rutabaga. Yes! It was time to cook the acorn. (I used the¬†rest of the rest of the rutabaga, similarly diced and plantain oil sauteed, in¬†a good tomato sauce the same day.)

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Asparagus –¬†Spring time means not¬†only fresh spinach, but also fresh kale, lettuce, strawberries, and asparagus! (and more). The picture above is from a few weeks ago, when I stopped at Terhune Orchards one afternoon after a bike ride and picked a few pounds of asparagus and several quarts of strawberries. Mmmmmmmmmmm, fresh local strawberries. I wish I had some right now… Yes, and asparagus too ūüôā Part of me also wishes that I had a good picture of the strawberries to use here, as a nice, sweet, juicy, red picture would look great following the yellow and green ones above. But that’s alright. And in the absence of such a picture,¬†let’s give asparagus a little extra love. If you’ve never seen asparagus¬†growing, that’s really how it¬†looks in the field, the green shoots growing right up out of the ground (followed by tall ferns later if the spears aren’t¬†harvested). To pick asparagus, you just snap the shoots¬†off at the base.¬†And then once you’re home, you can steam them, add them to pasta, put them in risotto, grill them, roast them with olive oil /¬†salt /¬†pepper and then add a little lemon juice right at the end!, and¬†do lots of other things I’ll try sometime. Lately I’ve been steaming them since it’s quick, like¬†5-10 minutes, and then¬†adding either a little salt or no salt. Easy and good.

In the process of finding the rutabaga, I came¬†across a few other things in the fridge that, shall we say, ran out of time. Usually I’m pretty good at using things¬†up, but there were a few small things I had to toss this time. And in the world where food mirrors¬†life, and combine, so too were¬†there some ideas I thought I would use when I started writing, but that now I know I’m going to have to toss. In the process of writing, and now¬†feeling where I’m at and the writing is¬†at, I’m reminded again that not everything can make it into the soup. Ideas, people, and stories can’t be forced; it’s better¬†when it all¬†flows and happens naturally. As another friend once reminded too, if it’s important and needs to be felt or said, there’s always another post, another time.

In the garden, things are growing. The passage of time, a month, allows me to share the following:

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May 9

May 16

May 16

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May 23

June 5

June 5

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Projected future outcome

Actual results may vary…

But where there are buds, flowers often follow ūüôā

For now, I found some flowers of another kind, from thinning the radishes,

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Radish bouquet

and found some color, and neat patterns too, from underground.

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How about that for beauty? It’s like looking down at farm fields from an airplane, but with¬†every shade of red instead of green (and with a lyrical inspiration nod to “The Hudson” by Dar Williams).¬†I think I have a thing for radishes.

In the garden, looking back, looking now

I got the call about two and half weeks ago. It was the Recreation Department, letting me know the community garden season would be ending soon. It was time to clean up my plot so they could rototill and prepare the garden for the winter and next year.

Listening to the message, one of my initial thoughts was, I could have planted more, weeded more…written more. There was the basil to cook with and write about, the tomatoes to see ripen, and the sunflowers to watch grow and bloom.¬†But that’s okay. I’m writing now, and right now I’m thinking about the pictures and words that will follow here, from my recent last¬†visits to the garden. I’m also thinking about how later on, should a thought or recipe bring a garden moment to mind, I can¬†revisit the garden at those times, too.

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This is not how the garden looked this past weekend, one week into November. But before getting to the present, I wanted to share a little warmth from the past.

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The morning glories had a good time with the sun, too. These pictures were all from early September.

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The interesting thing about my last visits to the garden Рthere was a brief stop during a morning run, the day after the call; a longer visit a few days later, to look in again; and two final trips last weekend, for the final clean-up Рis that even though it was a more muted scene, with browns and fleeting greens before the final frost, there was still a lot to see and think about.

A week and a half ago, from a few yards away, this is what I saw:

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The exterior scene matched my expectations – I knew it would look a little overgrown and tired, and take on a subdued palette –¬†but then, upon walking around, and in, the garden, I realized there was more. It wasn’t from seeing up close the morning glory seeds that I knew I was¬†going to collect, or from considering¬†the collard greens¬†that had leaves yet to¬†harvest. It was the flowers. There¬†were a few persistent flowers yet. There were a few morning glories and some radish flowers.

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How often do you get to see a radish flower?

I must have seen some radish flowers¬†earlier in the year, but now¬†in November, with fewer distractions, it felt like I was seeing them for the first time.¬†The¬†novelty reminded me of the obvious – when you let plants grow, whether by accident or design, they know how to take care of themselves. They do what they’re made to do – they flower, produce seeds, and foster the next generation.¬†The radish is no dummy.

In this case, it was a¬†combination of luck and purpose from which the radish flowers bloomed. I didn’t¬†harvest all the radishes initially, and then later when the remaining ones were past their, shall we say, salad days, I had the thought, ‘The plants aren’t taking up too much room…Why don’t I leave them there and see what happens?’

For the radish-uninitiated, what happens is the following: the radish bulb sitting at ground level gets¬†a little bigger, while the rest of the plant above ground grows a lot. In the garden¬†this year, it was as if the radish plants were playing and ultimately winning a¬†game of, ‘Let’s see how many branches and seed pods we can produce by the fall, to make sure there are more radishes next year and to impress curious onlookers.’

The following pictures are all from November, but they convey a sense of the progression. 

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Flowers,
Green pods,
Dried pods,
Seedlings, and
More seedlings.

I felt a little bad that these little ones wouldn’t make it much longer with colder weather and rototiller to come, but their presence was also reassuring. The radish plants,¬†left¬†to themselves, had produced some good¬†seeds. As I was cleaning up the garden, I collected all of the dried pods.¬†They¬†filled up more than half of a quart-size bag – a decent¬†yield from the four or so radish plants that had been left to grow.

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If you’re curious as to how many radish seeds are in this many dried pods, I have an easy three-step process you can¬†use.

1. Consider the yield from a smaller number of pods:

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2. Consider the number of pods in the bag. As an aid, I’ll also give you the profile.

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3. Use your best math skills to determine the number of seeds.

This actually worked for me in my eighth grade German class when my guess was within 10 and I won the approximately 243 Gummi B√§ers in the jar. At a summer picnic this year¬†though, when I tried to guess the number of candy bars in a large jar, I was way off.¬†But radish seeds.¬†And seed pods.¬†And a quart bag. Now there’s a contest!

To be honest, the idea of¬†inaugurating a radish seed contest was not in my head when I started writing this post. But now that we’re here — Let’s do it!


The Ultimate Radish Seed Contest

These will be the rules, and the prizes:

  1. Guess the number of seeds by leaving a comment below.
  2. For a tie-breaker and the second prize, also guess for the number of seed pods.
  3. All seed-guesses must be at least 5 numbers apart.
  4. It’s okay for guesses to go over or under the actual number.
  5. The guess closest to the actual number of seeds wins. 

First prize: A packet of radish seeds, plus a small original hand-drawn radish sketch
Second prize: A packet of radish seeds

The last day to guess will be Friday, November 21, 2014 – a week from today. Then I’ll open the bag and start counting. I’ll also draw a few pictures and then announce the results.


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This is going to be fun. In¬†fact, it¬†already is. It also brings me back to the garden, thinking of the many different yields and everything¬†the garden¬†has to offer. There are vegetable yields, when you plant vegetables. There are flower yields, when you plant flowers. And along the way, there’s always more. There is a little help from a garden neighbor one day. There is¬†trading extra plants another week. And there is practicing Spanish with some of the gardeners during the year. There are also sunflowers to enjoy. There are volunteer collards to appreciate. And there seeds¬†to collect and play games with.

In addition to the radish seeds, I also collected basil, cilantro, and morning glory seeds during my last visit to the garden. The morning glory seeds are in another quart-size bag, and the basil and cilantro, clipped as dried stalks from the garden, are for now providing household decoration.

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And so the garden ends for the year, but it also continues along with everything else. There are stories to write, pictures to draw, and future gardens to plan. And there are also, I will add, seeds to count.

A good start in the garden

I got the call from the Recreation Department in mid-April. I was officially off the wait-list! I’d be rejoining the community garden this year.

It was a good feeling to get the good news – I’d moved in the past year and so couldn’t have a front yard garden as before. I was ready to go! The only problem (but not really, in the big picture) was the Recreation Department’s¬†follow-up detail that the garden wasn’t ready for planting yet. They said¬†it might be ready in a few weeks – maybe by Mother’s Day – after the annual roto-tilling and plot-marking was done. In the end, they bested¬†their Mother’s Day mark by about a week,¬†so come the first week in May, everything was¬†set. We were¬†underway.

The garden area, ready for planting: a 4 x 6 grid of plots, so space for 24. My plot: center bottom here.

The community garden in early May, ready for planting. Overall: a 4 x 6 grid of plots, so space for 24. My plot: center bottom here.

And then so what to plant? To the farmers’ market! The market!…For some plugs to transplant. And to the box! The box! …For the collection of seeds I’d accumulated over time by purchase (most of them), by gift (a few), or¬†by end-of-season collecting (a handful).

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Curious to know what was inside? So was I!

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The view upon opening

The box certainly contained an assortment of seeds. Here are a few stats and a look at the contents:

  • Total number of seed packets/bags/containers: 109
  • Greatest amount¬†of any one kind: ¬†Sunflowers – 11
  • Second place: ¬†Tomatoes – 8
  • Oldest packet: ¬†Peppermint – 1999
  • Second oldest: ¬†Chinese Cabbage – 2001 (two packets) (also a Hot Pepper packet and a Sweet Pepper packet – 2001)
  • Newest packet: Zucchini – 2014 (from the NOFA-NJ conference – free)
  • Second¬†newest: Sunflowers and Carrots – 2013 (from Johnny’s – purchased)
  • Packets that pack a story: Three flower packets from The Page Seed Company (Marigolds, Snapdragons, Pansies) that have the Hartford Courant imprimatur on the back

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I got these seeds for free over ten years ago, so now they're not so much Hartford Courant as Hartford Old seeds. Maybe one day there'll also be a Princeton Packet promotion -- and then I could get a pack of Packet seed packets.

I got these seeds for free over ten years ago while working in Connecticut, so now¬†they’re not so much Hartford Courant¬†as Hartford Old seeds. I have a feeling that the Courant germination rate may be¬†similar to¬†an Old germination rate now. I’m going to plant some and see what happens.

Maybe one day there’ll also be a Princeton Packet seed promotion, and¬†then I could say I got a pack of Packet seed packets.

The box also contained some interesting odds and ends, like a ziploc bag full of marigold seeds, a bent spoon container with sunflower seeds, a small folded paper with some chives seeds, and a medicine bottle with Grandpa Ott Morning Glory seeds.

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IMG_3921 Grandpa Ott¬†in a bottle. I don’t actually have a Grandpa Ott, but my aunt’s handwriting had me thinking¬†for a minute¬†that maybe I did.

I always liked morning glories – as a kid I can remember them¬†climbing the strings on¬†the side of the house all the way up to the attic fan, and I can also remember being¬†inside the attic looking out, seeing the morning glories¬†almost trying to come in¬†– so it was an easy¬†decision to plant some of these. Plus, there’s the awesome medicine bottle storage! I definitely wouldn’t have to¬†worry about little kids eating the seeds and then having morning glories sprout in the their stomachs. (To be honest, morning glories probably wouldn’t sprout in their¬†stomachs, but I heard it might be a different story with watermelon seeds, which¬†kids could consume¬†with a greater frequency).*

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First I planted some morning glories the garden. This is how they look in mid-June, a few weeks after sprouting.

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I also planted some in a planter by my house. My next step here will be to talk with my neighbor about some strategic planter placement to see how Grandpa Ott feels about climbing a fire escape.

Of the other interesting odds and ends above, I also tried planting the marigold and sunflower seeds in the garden, but apparently they didn’t share the same vigor as the morning glory seeds and¬†decided not to come up.

No matter though, at least for the sunflowers. I dipped into my multitude of other seed packets and found success there.

little sunflower

A little baby sunflower in mid-June. Now imagine about 30 of these in close proximity, and then imagine all of them all grown up and with lots of beautiful flowers. And then remember to check back here in a few months to see if your imagination matches how this portion (about a quarter) of the garden plot turns out.

As for the rest of the plot, I have about¬†4/5 of it planted now after a month and a half. I¬†transplanted about 10¬†tomatoes (mostly of the sauce and paste variety), 4 hot peppers (of the some degree of hot variety), and¬†6 basil plants (of the traditional Genovese, goes well with tomatoes and other things variety). Thank you by the way local community farmers’ markets and New Jersey farmers for the seedlings.¬†In terms of what came up from the seeds I planted, I also have¬†radishes, cilantro, cucumbers, and zucchini growing in the garden.

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One of the tomatoes, shortly after its mid-May transplant

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The same tomato, now in mid-June

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Radishes, harvested this week

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Same bunch

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Nothing says instant garden gratification like a bunch of radishes

cilantro

Then again, cIlantro’s also a quick pleaser

 

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And another look at the garden, mid-June. The sunflowers will likely feature more prominently in future looks, hugging the bottom corner and all along the right side.

Overall, so far so good, and more to come.